Solo lunches can be such deli­cious affairs. You can eat left­overs. (One of my all-time favorite foods.) You can eat stand­ing at the frig. (Not rec­om­mended.) Or you can build a gourmet sand­wich from fix­ins’ and condi­ments you have on-hand, such as these pretty and pink pick­led red onions.

pickled red onions3

The fact is, some of my favorite type of restau­rant menus to peruse are from sand­wich joints. It’s amaz­ing the wild and won­der­ful things hum­ble sand­wich restau­rants can come up with—usually for less than $10.

Years ago, one of my favorite lunchtime breaks from work was at a restau­rant that packed a pita with ched­dar cheese, black and green olives. That’s it. Four ingre­di­ents. But it was packed full and then fired in the wood oven and served with a sim­ple vinai­grette. Think­ing back on it, it’s a good thing my metab­o­lism was fir­ing high in those days because that sand­wich prob­a­bly had about 1,500 calories—before the french fries on the side!

These days I like to keep spe­cialty condi­ments in the frig for days when I have home­made bread and can jus­tify the calo­ries. Favorite ingre­di­ents include pick­les of all types, avo­ca­dos, hum­mus or other bean dip, arugula and any­thing cheese.

In my opin­ion, a food gets extra points if it’s pretty, so I wanted pretty pick­led onions for my condi­ment selec­tion. These onions fit the bill and make a per­fect addi­tion to the toasted Swiss, avo­cado and arugula sand­wich I’m crav­ing a lot these days. Total time is about an hour once you have assem­bled all your sup­plies and ingre­di­ents. You’ll take away about seven or eight lit­tle half-pint jars. You can give some as gifts or just hoard them all for your­self and those sand­wich days.

 

  • Pick­led Red Onions

Ingre­di­ents

Serv­ings:

Instruc­tions

  1. Ster­il­ize 7 to 8 half-pint can­ning jars and lids in a water bath can­ner. While jars process, slice onions.
  2. Com­bine vine­gar, sugar and salt in a dutch oven. Bring to a boil and sum­mer until sugar and salt are dis­solved. Add sliced onion to the vine­gar mix­ture and reduce heat. Sim­mer, uncov­ered, for about 5 min­utes. Do not let the onions get soft.
  3. Remove jars from water bath. Place 1/4 tea­spoon all­spice berries, 1/4 tea­spoon mus­tard seeds, one bay leaf and one sprig of thyme into each jar. Trans­fer onions to each jar and top with the hot vine­gar liq­uid, leav­ing 1/2 inch headspace.
  4. Fin­ger tighten lids on the jars to seal and process jars in the water bath can­ner for 10 min­utes. Remove jars from water and let stand, undis­turbed, at room tem­per­a­ture for 24 hours.
  5. Check the jars. Prop­erly sealed jars will make a POP sound as they cool and/or the metal lid will be slightly con­cave. If you can press the lid and make a pop­ping sound, the jar is not sealed. Store unsealed jars in the refrig­er­a­tor and use right away. Store sealed jars in a cool, dark place and use within one year.

Share this Recipe

 

Robin

Aug 20
2013

Pickled Red Onions

  • Pick­led Red Onions

Ingre­di­ents

Serv­ings:

Instruc­tions

  1. Ster­il­ize 7 to 8 half-pint can­ning jars and lids in a water bath can­ner. While jars process, slice onions.
  2. Com­bine vine­gar, sugar and salt in a dutch oven. Bring to a boil and sum­mer until sugar and salt are dis­solved. Add sliced onion to the vine­gar mix­ture and reduce heat. Sim­mer, uncov­ered, for about 5 min­utes. Do not let the onions get soft.
  3. Remove jars from water bath. Place 1/4 tea­spoon all­spice berries, 1/4 tea­spoon mus­tard seeds, one bay leaf and one sprig of thyme into each jar. Trans­fer onions to each jar and top with the hot vine­gar liq­uid, leav­ing 1/2 inch headspace.
  4. Fin­ger tighten lids on the jars to seal and process jars in the water bath can­ner for 10 min­utes. Remove jars from water and let stand, undis­turbed, at room tem­per­a­ture for 24 hours.
  5. Check the jars. Prop­erly sealed jars will make a POP sound as they cool and/or the metal lid will be slightly con­cave. If you can press the lid and make a pop­ping sound, the jar is not sealed. Store unsealed jars in the refrig­er­a­tor and use right away. Store sealed jars in a cool, dark place and use within one year.

Share this Recipe

Robin
There are no comments
Filed in: Uncategorized

Garden and food writer Robin Ripley is co-author of Grocery Gardening. Her new book, Wisdom for Home Preservers, will be released later in 2014 from Taunton Press.

Bumblebee is about her life in rural Maryland, her garden, cooking, dogs and pet chickens. She also blogs about food and chickens at Eggs & Chickens. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook. Thank you for visiting.

Subscribe

Email Updates

To get the latest Bumblebee posts in your email box, just enter your email address.

  • Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On PinterestCheck Our Feed
  • Tags

  • Recent Posts

  • Google