Archive for the ‘Gardening Life’ Category

I went out this morn­ing for my daily run/walk. I say “run/walk.” I used to say “run.” Now I say “run/walk.” It’s really “walk.” I am still in denial about the whole knee pain situation.

Any­way, I digress.

I went out this morn­ing for my daily run/walk. Most days I lis­ten to books via Audi­ble on my iPhone while I run/walk because a good book with a com­pelling sto­ry­line and a tal­ented reader who keeps me hang­ing on every word makes me want to keep run/walking so I don’t have to go inside and work/work. It’s a fab­u­lous way to procrastinate/procrastinate and still feel a wee bit vir­tu­ous. I’m read­ing and exer­cis­ing! In fact, I am pretty much on track to fin­ish 100 Kin­dle, tra­di­tional and audio­books this year as part of my Goodreads goal.

fall in the potager

Lemon grass and pineap­ple sage salvia in the potager — October

This morn­ing I had to fum­ble a bit before get­ting Audi­ble up and run­ning. (Thank you iOS 7 for mak­ing me add a pass­word.) While I was mash­ing vir­tual but­tons on the minus­cule screen with­out ben­e­fit of my read­ing glasses, I ran/walked sev­eral yards, not look­ing at the first thing except that tiny screen.

Sud­denly it hit me. Smoke. Specif­i­cally, wood smoke from someone’s fireplace.

Now, I’m not big into fire­places with smoke because of sen­si­tive sinuses and a strong ten­dency to get painful sinus infec­tions when exposed to smoke of any sort. But small doses of out­side smoke from some­one else’s fire­place a half mile away is rather nice. It says, “Fall!” It says, “Time to reflect and slow down.” It says, “Drink some hot choco­late and take a nap!”

It’s a smell with dozens of asso­ci­a­tions from child­hood and from the hap­pi­est (and a few sad) times of my life. That smell was accom­pa­nied by the nature music of my feet brush­ing aside the fallen leaves as I walked up the driveway.

Slow down!” I said to myself. (But don’t stop running/walking!)

I put away the iPhone and looked at the mosaic of colors—red, yel­low, brown, green and every color of fall, punc­tu­ated by the occa­sional, fear­less rose, salvia and celosia.

celosia cock's comb

Celosia–commonly called cock’s comb–in the potager

If I could bot­tle up that fan­tas­ti­cal com­bi­na­tion of smell, sound, fresh air, color—and the rush of the run/walk—I would be richer than Oprah.

Alas, no one has fig­ured out how to cap­ture the magic of Mother Nature, although artists, pho­tog­ra­phers, musi­cians and per­fumers still try.

But I am still rich. I am rich because I can appre­ci­ate the gifts Mother Nature hands out for free to any­one will­ing to pause in their run/walk through life and appre­ci­ate it.

Namaste.

 

 

Robin

As I was brows­ing around over on Pin­ter­est this morn­ing, I was impressed with some of the solu­tions gar­den­ers found to com­mon gar­den­ing problems—organizing gar­den tools and sup­plies, pro­tect­ing and sup­port­ing plants, label­ing plants, nur­tur­ing and dec­o­rat­ing. I have also seen some fab­u­lous, clever and cheap gar­den solu­tions from gar­den tours in recent years, so I thought I would pull them out of the archives and share.

I have noticed that gar­den­ers are quite thrifty in uti­liz­ing and repur­pos­ing avail­able mate­ri­als. Twigs, sticks and vines can be used to sup­port plants, as trel­lises and even just for decor.

stick trellis or plant support

Sticks and vines clus­tered and tied to a cen­ter bam­boo stake make a dec­o­ra­tive and func­tional plant support

A series of larger sticks can be pushed into the ground for peas, sweet­peas and other plants that could use a bit of extra sup­port. One year we used branches from mimosa trees that had blown down in a storm to cre­ate a cucum­ber trellis.

sticks used as pea stakes

Sticks can also be pushed into the ground to cre­ate ver­ti­cal sup­ports for peas, sweet­peas and other plants that need support.

mimosa tree branches for trellis

Tree branches sal­vaged after a storm were used in our gar­den to cre­ate a rus­tic cucum­ber trellis.

If you need to block off a path or area to dis­cour­age foot traf­fic, a col­lec­tion of sal­vaged branches can accom­plish the same thing.

Salvaged branches assembled to block a pathway

Sal­vaged branches assem­bled to block a pathway

Unusual mate­ri­als can also be repur­posed in the gar­den for many pur­poses. I have often seen marine-grade rope draped to cre­ate attrac­tive sup­ports for trail­ing roses and vines.

marine rope for roses

Marine-grade rope can be used to sup­port trail­ing roses and vines.

How about repur­pos­ing sand­bags? They can be used to cre­ate tem­po­rary walls, gar­den seat­ing or raised beds.

raised beds from sand bags

Sand­bags can be used to cre­ate tem­po­rary and mov­able raised beds.

Tree stumps can be unsightly and expen­sive to remove. If it’s large enough, a tree stump can be repur­posed as a nov­elty gar­den seat, table or planter pedestal.

tree stump seat

A tree stump doesn’t have to be an unsightly eye­sore in the gar­den. Re-imagine it as a gar­den chair!

Aren’t gar­den­ers won­der­fully cre­ative and clever?

You can fol­low my board of gar­den solu­tions over on Pinterest.

 

 

Robin

Garden and food writer Robin Ripley is co-author of Grocery Gardening. Her new book, Wisdom for Home Preservers, is now available from Taunton Press. Bumblebee is about her life in rural Maryland, her garden, cooking, dogs and pet chickens. She also blogs about food and chickens at Eggs & Chickens. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook. Thank you for visiting.

Subscribe

Email Updates

To get the latest Bumblebee posts in your email box, just enter your email address.

  • Tags

  • Recent Posts

  • Google